Paul Hirsch & Me: An Editing Genealogy

So, I made – wait for it – another Hannibal video. What a surprise.

But it confirmed something I had suspected for awhile about where my style – if you can call it that – in video editing comes from. So, I’m a kid… I don’t know exactly how old, but I think it might have been high school. Or college. But I think high school IDK. Anyway, I see Brian DePalma’s Phantom of the Paradise on TV… it’s a decade old by this point, give or take a few years, and certainly not his best-known film. But I am besotted, partly because I really like Paul Williams, who is cute and has straight hair IDEK.*

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Furigana, Vertical Montage, and the Video Essay

There’s a device used (primarily) in printed Japanese that I first became interested in back in the earliest days of my Adachi Mitsuru manga fandom (Touch, I liked Touch – which, yes, puts this in the 1980s). Furigana (or ‘ruby/i‘) are phonetic glosses of written kanji (Chinese characters); typically, they serve the very functional purpose of indicating how the kanji they append should be pronounced (which, when a given character can have upwards of ten+ different readings depending on context, is pretty useful). Continue reading Furigana, Vertical Montage, and the Video Essay

A Tale of Two Chairs

Or, Why Did My Paper Get a B?

It seems fairly common these days to find an explanation of what letter grades mean on course syllabi, and in my experience the difference between B work and A work is… unclear. It’s clear to the professor, of course (sometimes in that ‘I know an A paper when I see one’ kind of way), but the way it’s typically worded – “a B paper does everything well” vs. “an A paper exceeds expectations” – I mean, what the hell is that supposed to mean? And it’s difficult to explain, especially to irate students, until now.

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The Year in Productivity: 2015

I did a round-up post about this time last year as a way of kind of giving myself a little pep talk as I continue down the road of independent scholarship. That path was cemented a bit further this year with my last (unsuccessful) stab at the academic job market, and I’m now in the process of leaving one of my two adjuncting jobs in order to devote more time to writing. Continue reading The Year in Productivity: 2015

Truth in Advertising: Considering the Chinese Star Wars Poster

The UK’s Independent Online features an article this morning entitled, “The Chinese version of the Star Wars: Force Awakens poster has edited out the non-white characters,” in which it’s hypothesized that this is likely an example of either Chinese racism or Hollywood assumptions about Chinese racism. The piece is accompanied by this graphic, which shows the two posters back to back:

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The Puppy Postulate, or Why Some Women Like Sherlock (and Other Things)

I don’t know what the secret is, just that the fanbase happens to be very female. I don’t know why.

~ Steven Moffat

willknowswhy Continue reading The Puppy Postulate, or Why Some Women Like Sherlock (and Other Things)

A Tale of Two Show(runner)s

My most recent fannish loves – in a long line of infatuations – have been BBC’s Sherlock and NBC’s Hannibal (the network designations belie the transnational coproduction contexts of each, but that’s a post for another day). Both are named for characters who have unwittingly embarked on journeys of emotional discovery, precipitated by and torturously focused on the first men we see in each series, who themselves hide behind walls of self-delusion that they are somehow ‘normal’ in contrast with the titular characters’ abnormalities. Continue reading A Tale of Two Show(runner)s

A Fledgling Vidder’s First Attempt at Transformation

For the past week or so, I’ve been working my way through the first week of exercises featured in Middlebury College’s digital humanities workshop, Scholarship in Sound & Image, as described by television scholar Jason Mittell on his blog. I had wanted to apply to participate in the workshop, which ran for two weeks this past June, but conferences in Ireland and the UK made that impossible; however, there was enough to be going on in the blog post that I felt reasonably confident giving it a go on my own. Continue reading A Fledgling Vidder’s First Attempt at Transformation

Adventures in Vidding

This past summer at the Fan Studies Network Conference held at the University of East Anglia, I had the pleasure of meeting and talking vidding a bit with Tisha Turk – a conversation that, once again, made me long to be able to make sense of my iMovie app. I’ve watched from afar as video essay after brilliant video essay has made art of analysis, each one intensifying my desire to make… something. Anything – vid, essay, whatever. But every time I opened iMovie, it seemed incomprehensible.

Enter Hannibal.

Continue reading Adventures in Vidding